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Archive for the ‘What is a Good Death?’ Category

Isadore Millstone

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1907-2009.

From the St. Louis Post-Dispatch:

Perhaps he wanted us to talk about it. How else to explain the public nature of his final act? In fact, it was the means of his death that most puzzled me. Why not a fistful of pills and a highball? That would have been the easy way. Pour a glass of the finest whiskey, cut it with sweet vermouth — whiskey lovers will argue that that is a waste of good whiskey, but a man about to enjoy a final drink should not worry about such criticism — and then wash down the pills and sip your drink. Let the caregiver find your body.

Maybe because they’re fucking impossible to get, asshole.[1] Especially for a 102-year-old saint.

RIP.


1. I don’t actually think Bill McClellan is an asshole. Based on his article, I think he’s kind of a mensch.

Written by Sister Y

June 16, 2009 at 7:17 am

How Do You Want Your Death to Be? Finding Common Ground with Non-Suicides

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Each one of us will die. What do you want your death to be like?

What do you want to happen when you die? Do you want to live as long as possible? How long would be ideal? Do you want to die in a hospital, or at home? If you were dying of pancreatic cancer, would you want complete pain relief, even if it meant that you might die from a morphine overdose? Or would you want to live as long as possible, even if in pain? Would you want doctors to introduce a feeding tube? What if the feeding tube gave you severe, constant diarrhea? If you had lived with Alzheimer’s for a decade and could no longer recognize anyone and didn’t know where you were, and you came down with pneumonia, would you want to be treated for it and cured of the pneumonia? Or would you want to die naturally of pneumonia, even though it is a treatable condition? Do you want to continue living as long as you are conscious? As long as you are able to have meaningful interactions? As long as you are able to maintain your activities of daily living? As long as you can hold your grandchildren? As long as you are, technically, alive? Do you want the ability to control the manner of your death?

There is no right answer to any of the questions above. People’s wishes for their own deaths are idiosyncratic, and should be: people’s wishes for their lives, and definitions of a good life, are certainly diverse; why should the same not be true of death? The question is: once you have though about your own death and decided what you want, do you want to deny another person his “good death”? Or do you want people to be free to have lives, and deaths, as close to their ideals as possible?

Admitting that death is a natural part of life, and thinking about how we want our own deaths to be, is, I think, an important part of being a mature human being. However, some authors, like Thomas Joiner, think that irrational, visceral fear of death is not only healthy, but that it is pathological to lose this fear of death:

. . . the erosion of fear and the attendant ability to tolerate and engage in lethal self-injury may set into motion still other psychological processes that are important in suicidality; namely, the merging of death with themes of vitality and nurturance. Only when people have lost the usual fear and loathing of death do they become capable of construing it in terms related, ironically, to effectiveness and belongingness. Only those who desire death and have come not to fear it can believe that through death, their need to belong and to be effective will be met. [Why People Die By Suicide, by Thomas Joiner. Harvard University Press, 2005, p. 226.]

But it is far from clear that the “usual fear and loathing” of an inevitable, natural, well-understood process is healthy and in the interests of human flourishing. Such a fear prevents honest and productive reflection on one’s own death.

This is not to say that dislike of death, or a strong preference against death, is a problem. A strong preference against death might be an important value held by a person, based upon which the person may make rational decisions. But, except in terms of crude survival, an irrational “fear and loathing” of death is not warranted, nor should it be encouraged.

There are many obstacles to having a mature conversation, as citizens, about death. The irrational fear of death (as opposed to a love of life) is one of these obstacles. But there are other obstacles. One, I think, is the tendency for some in the anti-suicide community to emotional overreaction to any reference to suicide in the wider culture that is not both deadly serious and in accord with their beliefs.

For instance, this week, someone calling himself an “internet safety campaigner” for the British anti-suicide group PAPYRUS, is calling for the “removal” of a computer game called Billy Suicide, in which players try to prevent a character from committing suicide by maintaining his caffeine and antidepressant levels, among other things. (One can only imagine he hasn’t heard of Karoshi Suicide Salaryman, in which each level’s puzzle calls for the player to help a cute, energetic salaryman commit suicide.) Says the “internet safety campaigner” (in the Telegraph):

This game is completely irresponsible and the people who made the game should realise the damage that it can incur in the terms of somebody taking their (sic) own life

A “spokesperson for the Samaritans” agrees that culture-wide discussions of suicide should never, ever happen with any lightheartedness, based on a credulous acceptance of the poorly understood and controversial phenomenon of suicide contagion:

Suicide is not a light-hearted subject and is (sic) should always be taken seriously.

Certain types of suicide portrayal can act as a catalyst to influence the behaviour of people who are already vulnerable, particularly young people, and result in an overall increase in suicide and/ or an increase in uses of particular methods.

I think that, in the interest of greater cultural maturity on the issues of death and suicide, all conversations about death and suicide should be encouraged – even seemingly immature conversations, and conversations that take place via marginalized art forms like computer games. Good faith should be presumed, rather than malice. It is not pathological, but crucial that we lose our cultural fear of death.

An old family friend used to joke that, when he got so old as to be helpless, he wanted his sons to roll him out into the woods he’d hunted in for years, in his wheelchair, and hang strips of raw bacon over his ears so that the bears would eat him. This was his way, I think, of introducing the somewhat tabooed topic of death control – telling people that he didn’t want to die, helpless and intubated, in a hospital. I don’t think he was wrong to make such a remark.

A person who does not fear death is not a monster or mentally ill. He is free to pursue his values as he sees them – including, often, a love for life and a desire to avoid death. He may be courageous in the face of death or danger, able to realize that some things are more important than preserving his own life at any cost. He need not be a suicide; usually, he is probably not a suicide. He is not the slave of his genes. He is not a slave at all.

Written by Sister Y

November 13, 2008 at 9:14 pm

Zócalo Panel: What is a Good Death?

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Southern Californians with an interest in suicide rights may be interested in attending a Zócalo panel discussion on November 12, tagged What is a Good Death?

Zócalo presentations are always deep, and feature well-curated panels. From the program description:

Thanks to medical advances, we now live longer, but living longer doesn’t necessarily make death any easier when it comes. Forget the good life, what in this world makes a good death? How does culture affect our choices? Hospice, palliative care, assisted suicide – all offer some relief to suffering, yet it is our uncertainty about the end of life that keeps our dread alive.

Experts visit Zócalo to share first-hand accounts and clinical insight: Dr. Susan Stone, the Director of Palliative Care at the Los Angeles County Medical Center; Dr. Betty Ferrell of the City of Hope National Medical Center; and moderator Dr. Michael Wilkes, Vice Dean for Medical Education at UC Davis, join us for an evening of big questions that demand courage, compassion, and a dash of wit.

The panel is at NPR West in Culver City on Wednesay, November 12, at 7:30 p.m. It’s free, and it helps to get an online reservation.

Written by Sister Y

October 21, 2008 at 2:03 am